Sensory processing podcast

News

Sensory processing podcast

podcast

We've launched a new podcast, bringing together autistic people, parents, carers and professionals to talk about different aspects of autism. Our first series focuses on sensory processing and is hosted by Holly Sprake-Hill, a neurodivergent occupational therapist, read more about Holly below. 

Some of our podcast episodes contain specialist terms you may be unfamiliar with. We've put together a ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠glossary ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠to explain some of the terms mentioned. 

Where can I listen to the podcast?

Listen to a clip or the full episode below or follow us on your preferred platform. 

Listen to the full episodes

Episode one: 
Sensory processing

Holly Sprake-Hill, a neurodivergent occupational therapist, discusses all things sensory processing with her colleague Denise Martin. We learn more about what sensory processing is and the differences that autistic people can experience.

Episode two: 
Supporting sensory needs of non-speaking children

Holly Sprake-Hill meets parents of non-speaking autistic children, Jade Page and Paul Anderson, who share their experiences around sensory processing and what works for their families.

Episode three:
Experiencing sensory differences as an autistic person

Holly Sprake-Hill, Loren Snow and Stu Ferrol discuss their experiences of sensory processing differences as late-diagnosed autistic adults and share their top tips for parents.

Episode four:
Sensory differences as a non-speaking autistic person

Holly Sprake-Hill speaks to Tim Chan, a non-speaking autistic person, and his mother Sarah about sensory processing and how to support people with communication differences.

Holly Sprake-Hill

Meet Holly

Holly Sprake-Hill is a children's occupational therapist specialising in neurodivergent affirming autism practice, working within the NHS and independent sector. She is a parent to two exceptional children with special educational needs and is late diagnosed autistic/ADHD.

Holly provides training, advocacy and works with schools, education authorities, voluntary services, local authorities and health commissioners to try and raise the level of understanding around autism and the needs of autistic people.
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